Automatic Devices Company

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Machines FAQ

Why does the machine need to be located 10 to 12 feet from the last pulley?

The reason is to minimize the Fleet Angle of the cable at the live-end pulley. Helical grooved drums require that the operating cable move horizontally along the surface of the drum as it turns. As the cable moves across the drum surface it creates an angle at the live-end pulley. This angle needs to be kept under 2 degrees in order minimize wear of the cable, pulley surface and wall of the drum's groove. In most cases, with average amounts of travel, 12' of distance produces and angle of 2 degrees or less.

Can I locate the machine above the track?

Yes. There are 2 methods for locating the machine above the track. One is to use a Flying type machine which is a draw machine modified to attach to the top of the track or pipe backbone.  Note that the track does not support the machine it simple attaches to it to provide correct alignment of the operating cables. The machine must be supported to an overhead structure capable of handling the static and dynamic loads of the machine.

The second method is to use a Horizontal style machine and mount it to a structural member above the track and in-line with its live-end pulley.

In both cases a Flying Live Pulley must be used with the track system in order to route the operating cable up and over to the machine mounted drum. Flying Live-End pulleys are available for most ADC track models.

Note that the machine's drum needs to be in-line with the live end pulley and the machine must still be located at least 10 to 12 feet from the last pulley.

Why do I need to use wire center cable with machine operated tracks?

Wire center cable must be used because it provides the necessary tensile strength needed for machine operated tracks. Wire center cable, of the type used by ADC, also stretches less than most synthetic center cords.  Jackets wire-center cable must be used.  Powder coated or bare steel cable is not acceptable. 

When should I use a Cable Tension Device?

Cable tension devices should be used with all curved track systems. They should also be used with long track systems.

The purpose of the CTD is to provide tension to the cable as the machine starts and operates. The load on the cable varies, especially on curved track systems, which causes the operating cable to slack and tense as it operates. Without a CTD on the machine, this change in tension could cause the cable to mis-wrap on the drum, causing problems with the track system.

What is MCS and when do I need it?

MCS is an acronym for Magnetic Control System. This control option removes the motor voltage and amperage from the remote control station(s) and replaces it with control coil voltage and amperage. It also provides and ESR (Electronic Safety Relay) circuit to the machine creating and anti-plugging circuit. Many ADC machines come with MCS as standard equipment. MCS is an important feature if the machine is being connected to an automation system. Many automation-input devices are not designed to handle full motor voltage and amperage.  The vast majority of ADC machines manufactured today are equipped with MCS as a standard feature. 

MCS IS ALSO REQUIRED WITH ANY MACHINE EQUIPPED WITH LVCS (LOW VOLTAGE CONTROL SYSTEM),

Can MCS be added to a machine already installed in the field?

Yes.  Adding MCS control to a machine requires that the machine be sent back to the factory for rewiring. UL, ETL, CSA, and CE all require that all modifications to the machine be done at the factory by factory personnel.

What is LVCS and when do I need to use it?

LVCS is an acronym for Low Voltage Control System. This option lowers the control voltage present at the remote control station(s) to 24 Vac or 24 Vdc depending on the model machine it is added to.

LVCS is usually needed when the machine is being connected to an automation system. Contact your automation provider and determine if the system automation can handle 120/220 Vac potentials. If it cannot, then LVCS will be needed.  The vast majority of ADC machines manufactured today are equipped with LVCS as a standard feature. 

Can LVCS be added to a machine already installed in the field?

Yes.  Adding LVCS control to a machine requires that the machine be sent back to the factory for rewiring. UL, ETL, CSA, and CE all require that all modifications to the machine be done at the factory by factory personnel.

MCS IS ALSO REQUIRED WITH ANY MACHINE EQUIPPED WITH LVCS (LOW VOLTAGE CONTROL SYSTEM),

Can I order a machine with variable speed?

Yes. ADC offers a full line of variable speed lift and draw machines. There are 2 types of variable speed machines available:

  • Frequency controlled machines which utilize electronic 3 phase frequency drives and inverter-duty 3 phase motors to provide programmable speed control as well as programmable accelerated starts and decelerated stops. Note that many of these Models can be fabricated for use with SINGLE PHASE 120 Vac and 220 Vac power sources in addition to 230-volt 3-phase power sources.
  • DC drive machines which utilize electronic DC drives and DC motors to provide variable speed and accelerated starts.  Because frequency drive is the preferred variable speed platform, DC drive variable speed machines are not in the current ADC catalog.  Call the factory for information on ADC DC drive machines.